Tag - veggie

Vegetarian Food on Suan Phlu

Vegetarian Food on Suan Phlu
Vegetarian Food on Suan Phlu
Vegetarian Food on Suan Phlu
Vegetarian Food on Suan Phlu
Vegetarian Food on Suan Phlu
Vegetarian Food on Suan Phlu
Vegetarian Food on Suan Phlu

Thailand does not really have a tradition of vegetarian cooking, and most dishes contain meat or fish. As a result, it can be a bit difficult for a veggie to fully appreciate the Thai cuisine, as most Thai vegetarian dishes are the meat versions with bits taken out. In central Bangkok, Suan Phlu (where the old immigration office was) offers a couple of restaurants that redress the balance.

Thailand does not really have a tradition of vegetarian cooking, and most dishes contain meat or fish. As a result, it can be a bit difficult for a veggie to fully appreciate the Thai cuisine, as most Thai vegetarian dishes are the meat versions with bits taken out. In central Bangkok, Suan Phlu (where the old immigration office was) offers a couple of restaurants that redress the balance.
 
Directly opposite the old Immigration office you have UR Station. It probably looks a bit more like a burger bar than a full on veggie restaurant, but looks can certainly be deceiving, and they are in this case. UR Station offers pretty much everything you could ask for. Both Thai and Western cuisine are available, with particular reference to the latter.

The cakes and pastries are great – blueberry crumble, chocolate buns, cheese croissants… there’s not much you could want for, including versions without egg. Washed down with one of a splendid choice of coffees, they make a great treat.

The Thai cuisine is excellent, too. Fried rice with curry or basil, tofu soup, and rice noodles all come in at the 55-65 Baht range and give you a proper taste of what Thai cooking is all about. The hands down winner though are the sandwiches and croissants. They have an excellent range including veggie ham and cheese and veggie tuna, and they are, to die for. They are truly excellent, and at 65 Baht, killer value. If you are in the area, don’t miss them. Tel: 02-287-1635, 089-490-3111 (mobile).
 
If, however, you are more interested in having traditional Thai fare in more typical surroundings, go out of immigration, and turn right. Keep walking until you get to Soi 8 and go into the Soi. On your right you will find Banbaiplu.

The owner, a suspiciously Singaporean-looking gentleman, with the suspiciously Singaporean-sounding name of ‘Andy Lam’ runs this establishment, and claims to be Thai. He speaks really good Singlish, too (so you guess what’s going on!). Anyway, this is a place where they do wonders with Soya protein and turn it into veggie meat that actually tastes like meat. So much so that you might start asking questions… but it’s true – those big lumps of fried pork, that even look like fried pork, are actually veggie! Being so meat-like, you get a much better insight into the regular Thai meal here. Curries, soups – Andy’s got the works, and all at nice prices. One dish with rice costs only 25 Baht – the same price the locals pay for meat versions. This is something to write home about! Tel: 068-080-7255 (mobile).

Leave Andy’s, go back to the street and turn right, and you’ll soon notice that you have masses of fruit on sale either side of the street. Fresh, clean, and again, despite the presence of so many foreigners, this is not a tourist area and prices are what locals pay. Stock up and put some in your room back on Khao San. Keep walking, and on your right you will soon notice Bobaimai Bakery.
 
This is a dainty little cafe? – actually, it’s small. But the food is good. They have cakes and all the sweet niceties you would expect to sit alongside a nice, hot cappuccino. As their sign suggests – “all natural with no additives or preservatives”, so they are well worth a look. Go out of Bobaimai Bakery, turn right again, and you will come across a stall selling Dim Sum which is part of a bigger restaurant. Although this restaurant serves meat as well, the stall (which faces the road) is dedicated to veggie food. It’s just Dim Sum, but they do a good job, and it’s well worth going down there just for a taste.

To get to Suan Plu By take bus nrs. 22 , 62 or 67. Lumpini Station is the closest MRT station.

The Vegetarian’s Guide to Thai Food

The Vegetarian's Guide to Thai Food
The Vegetarian's Guide to Thai Food
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A beautiful asset to world travel is the chance to try exciting new foods. Of course, Thailand boasts a famous cuisine; healthy, full of exotic new flavours, intricately spiced. Any traveler worth his chopsticks will tell you it’s some of the best in the world.

But while most people can dive right in to local fare, tourists with dietary restrictions must weather a gamble each time they place an order. As a vegetarian, I’ve endured my share of food slip-ups. People who don’t know about the meat-free food movement often mistake my plea for, “no red meat – bring on the chicken,” or “I just really like vegetables – put some extra ones on top of the meat.”

Luckily, once you overcome small hurtles, Thailand is a vegetarian’s dream. Tasty local fruits and vegetables, delicious tofu, and thanks to Buddhism, some familiarity with meat-free cooking. Below is a guide for hungry vegetarians traveling in Thailand and ready to sample local fare:

Where to Get Food

To find the tastiest Thai food, get off the backpacker trail and go to where the Thais are eating. This can mean night markets, food stalls on the street, or food courts in tiny local malls. Guesthouse restaurants boast English menus and some comforts from home (baguette sandwiches, full American breakfasts). However, unless you pop into a vegetarian cafe, the meat-free options are usually slim. Markets are cheaper, fresher, and the food isn’t catered for western palettes (no diluted spices here!). Also, you can watch the cook prepare the dish before you, so it’s easy to indicate what you do and don’t want in your meal.

Travelers don’t need to worry about protein. Most Thai vegetarian dishes come with egg, mixed into the meal or else fried and placed on top of the dish. Also, Thai cuisine boasts a few different kinds of tofu; the firm type that’s common in the west; a looser egg-based tofu (usually the tastiest for tofu-skeptics), and a greyish fish-based tofu, often sold on skewers in market stalls.
 
If Thai tofu and fried eggs aren’t your style, pop into a local market (or any 7-Eleven) and load up on nuts and seeds to carry in your bag. Then, you can order lots of veggies at meals and on islands and beaches, guesthouses will offer barbecues with fresh fish. Vegetarians should load up on baked potatoes (a tasty rarity in Thailand), vegetables, rice and eggs. Also, most restaurants will keep their kitchen open during the barbecue, so there’s no harm in topping up your grilled veggies with a noodle or rice dish.
 
Travelers don’t need to worry about protein. Most Thai vegetarian dishes come with egg, mixed into the meal or else fried and placed on top of the dish. Also, Thai cuisine boasts a few different kinds of tofu; the firm type that’s common in the west; a looser egg-based tofu (usually the tastiest for tofu-skeptics), and a greyish fish-based tofu, often sold on skewers in market stalls
 
What to Say
 
“I don’t want meat” – “mai sai neua-sa”
 
“I don’t want fish” – “mai sai plah”
 
” – with tofu” – “sai tao-hoo”
 
“-with egg” – “sai kao”
 
“with vegetables” – “sai pak”
 
Some Favourite Vegetarian Dishes
 
phad thai -fried noodles, a basic Thai staple (note, to order without shrimp, simply ask for “phad thai jae”)
 
phad see ewe – wide, flat noodles, fried with egg and soy sauce
 
kao phad pak – vegetable fried rice
 
phad pak jae – simple fried vegetables in a mild sauce
 
phad kapow – spicy Thai basil fried with chilies
 
som tam jae – green papaya salad in a tangy, spicy peanut sauce
 
kai yad sai pak – an omelette with vegetables
 
yam kai dow – a tangy salad with boiled eggs, onion, and tomato
 
tom yam hedt – a spicy tomato-based soup made with mushrooms
 
tom khaa hed – coconut soup with mushrooms
 
phad priow waan pak – sweet and sour mixed vegetables
 
For Vegans
 
Vegans fare well in Thailand, because dairy is rarely used in Thai cuisine. Most creamy soups and sauces are cooked with healthy coconut milk. However, eggs are prevalent in main dishes like phad thai. Many Thai noodle dishes use egg for texture. Saying “mai sai kao” to the cook will ensure that your dish is egg-free. To play it safe, vegans should stick to rice dishes with vegetables and tofu.
 
Also, be wary of the soy milk sold in Thai convenience stores. Some brands use soy for the nutrients, but mix it with dairy milk for flavour. If you’re ordering a fruit smoothie or dessert in a restuarant, “mai sai nome” means “no milk.”
 
When looking for restaurants, keep an eye out for Buddhist eateries, which use zero animal products. The signs are bright yellow with bright red lettering, and you can judge by the dishes of other customers whether the vegan food looks tasty (trust us, it usually is).

Anne Merritt is Canadian and has an English Literature degree. She has worked as a journalist for a university newspaper. She is currently living in Ayutthaya as an ESL teacher and is sharing her experience of Thailand with KhaoSanRoad.com.

Veggie Delight

Vegetarian Restaurants around Khao San Road and Bangkok, Thailand
Vegetarian Restaurants around Khao San Road and Bangkok, Thailand
Vegetarian Restaurants around Khao San Road and Bangkok, Thailand

Travelling in Thailand can be tough if you’re a vegetarian. Your senses are constantly assaulted by the myriad of meats on sticks barbecued on every street corner and the scent of fried chicken fills the air as you wait patiently for a bus to whisk you away.

Vegetarianism is definitely a lesson in tolerance, and I have learnt to turn a blind eye to the invasions of the meat loving society. Well, almost. Even more difficult, however, is finding decent veggie food, especially if you are on a budget. I spent my first six months in the Land of Smiles surviving mainly on pad Thai and boiled corn, not exactly a rich and varied diet.

But the truth is there are some excellent places for vegetarians to eat in Bangkok, if you know where to go. Here are some of my favourites:

May Kaidee, located 33 Samsen Road (Soi 1) and tucked away on 1117/1 Tanao Road, behind Burger King at the end of Khaosan Road is probably the most popular vegetarian restaurant in the area. Offering an incredibly diverse range of vegetarian Thai, Chinese and Japanese dishes, this is a great place to meet friends. All the dishes are freshly prepared and cooked, with flavours combined to perfection.

The pumpkin soup is simply fantastic, especially with ground ginger on top, and the organic brown rice is healthy and delicious. Dishes are affordable at around 50 Baht each and cooking courses are also available. Open 9 a.m – 11 p.m. daily.

Situated at the end of Soi 2, just off Samsen Road, Cafe Corner is also a great place to unwind. Converted from a traditional Thai shop, the cafe opens right onto the street and has a unique Bohemian feel.

Unusual, uplifting music is played in the background whilst you tuck into baguettes, pancakes or vegetarian Thai food. The range of cocktails makes this the perfect place to gather in the evening as well.

All the vegetables used are organic and come from farms in Suphanburi, Ratchaburi and the cafe’s own garden.

Just a ten minute walk from Khaosan Road, the recently opened Tham-na Home Restaurant can be found at 169 Samsen Road. The restaurant offers deliciously healthy vegetarian and vegan food served in a light and stylishly decorated restaurant. The restaurant’s motto is; “Vegetarian food for meat lovers,” and is a real treat for anyone who appreciates good food. The menu is filled with international favourites such as Japanese dishes, Thai food, hearty breakfasts and fresh, organic salads. There are western staples such as roast potatoes, or you can try the fried lotus root for an exotic alternative. Highly recommended is the baguette with mozzarella cheese and tangy sesame mushrooms.

Tanao Road is becoming a haven for vegetarians and Ethos restaurant brings a slightly Bohemian and cozy feel to the area. The menu is full of vegan and vegetarian dishes featuring flavours from around the world. Customers get to choose between the western style dining tables or sitting on the floor on pretty patterned cushions. Gorgeous red lamps made from red paper hang over the tables and complete the scene.

The Thai vegetarian dishes are a vibrant blend of colours and textures, fresh, crisp vegetables and tasty tofu chunks. The restaurant also serves large portions of western food such as lasagna, falafel and comfort food such as apple crumble and custard. Ethos offers free wifi, making this a great place to spend an afternoon trying the incredible selection of teas and the rich and creamy fruit lassis.

The vegetarian section of Chatuchak Market is one of Bangkok’s best-kept secrets. Also known as Chamlong’s Restaurant after Bangkok’s former governor K. Chamlong, this area features a collection of over thirty stalls selling delicious Thai, Chinese and Western dishes. Each stall offers its own speciality and fake meats are used to create dishes such as “fish” curry in banana leaf and “chicken” skewers.

Best of all, these delicious dishes are incredibly cheap, ranging from 10-20 Baht each, so you can afford to try a whole range. Run by the Santi Asoke monks, food is served daily from 8 a.m. – 2p.m.

Finding Chamlong’s Restaurant can be tricky at first. Take the subway to Kamphaeng Phet (exit 1) and turn right. Walk for five minutes and follow an alleyway between bars to a large warehouse. You can also take bus no 3 from Banglampoo.

If it is authentic Indian food you crave, look no further than Soi Rambutree, opposite Khoasan Road. Here you will find quite a few eateries offering eastern promise, all with an extensive vegetarian selection.

As you can see, there is vegetarian food to suit every taste in Bangkok. Don’t forget to try the Thai speciality Pad see-u Pak (rice noodles with egg and broccoli). Whatever you choose, remember to say arroy maak (tastes very good) at the end of your meal.

About the author:

Kirsty Turner (Kay) is a freelance writer currently living in Bangkok. She has kindly agreed to write for KhaoSanRoad.com and share her love of all things Thai and, especially, all things Khao San Road!