Tag - taxis

Types of Transport in Malaysia

Types of Transport in Malaysia
Types of Transport in Malaysia
Types of Transport in Malaysia

Transport in Malaysia tends to be safe and reliable and there aren’t really any no-go areas of the country. This usually means that getting around Malaysia is pleasant and hassle free.

However, most people return to their home town or village a day or two before public holidays, and public transport is usually very crowded during this time. Try to avoid travelling during public holidays and especially major festivals such as Deepavali, Chinese New Year and Christmas.

Plane
Travelling across Malaysia by aeroplane is generally quite cheap and certainly the easiest way to get around. The main airline is Malaysia Airlines and booking in advance online can save quite a bit of cash. Cheap flights are also provided by AirAsia.

Boat
There are regular ferries running between the mainland and the numerous islands located just off the east and west coasts of Malaysia. Tickets are usually bought in advance from booths on the mainland. In a few states, such as Sarawak, express boats are the most common form of public transport, carrying passengers down the rivers and streams that run through the areas.

Train
Malaysia’s railway network is fast and efficient, consisting of three types of service: express, limited express and local trains. Express trains are reserved for 1st and 2nd class passengers, limited express trains usually just 2nd and 3rd coaches, while local trains are usually limited to 3rd class. There are overnight sleeper births available on Express and limited express trains. Tourist rail passes are a good way to save money if you planning on travelling by train a lot and last for five days, ten days and fifteen days.

The Jungle Railway runs across Malaysia, stopping at every station between Tumpat and Gemas. This service is 3rd class only and there is no air-conditioning or reservations, meaning that the trains tend to be rather hot and crowded. However, the stunning jungle views more than make up for the discomfort.

Bus
Buses are the cheapest way to get around Malaysia and the best place to catch the bus and guarantee a seat is at the town’s bus terminal. There are luxury buses available for long-distance travel and these can be booked a couple of days in advance. The air-conditioned buses can be rather chilly, so take a blanket with you. Although they tend to be rather slow, local buses are regular and reliable.

Car and motorcycle
Driving in Malaysia is safe and convenient as the roads are good and there are plenty of new cars available to hire. Road rules are basically the same as in Britain and Australia, with right-hand drive cars that stick to the left side of the road. Petrol is generally cheap and motorbikes can also be hired from guesthouses in tourist towns and cities. Although Malaysian drivers are generally good, drivers still need to be careful, especially in large towns and cities as animals often roam freely across the roads.

Taxis
Taxis can be found in all cities and larger towns and usually drive around looking for customers. You will usually need to negotiate the fare in advance and it is a good idea to ask the staff at you guesthouse for an estimate of the going rate.

Trishaws
These bicycle rickshaws seat two people and can be a romantic way to see the sights.

Survival Tips for Thailand

Survival Tips in Thailand
Survival Tips in Thailand
Survival Tips in Thailand
Survival Tips in Thailand

Generally, Thailand is a very friendly place to visit, however a few precautions and a measure of common sense can go a long way to making your experience smooth and enjoyable.

It is a good idea to carry a selection of change such as 20 baht notes and coins as many people cannot change large notes, especially in small towns and villages. If you are stuck for change, buying an inexpensive item at 7/11 or a similar shop usually does the trick.

Touts at airports and other tourist areas are there for one reason only: to make money. Unfortunately, this usually involves parting unwary travelers from their cash. You should always question any offer that seems ‘too good’, and get a good idea of average hotel prices before agreeing to go with someone.

Always use the meter in taxis or, if taking a tuk-tuk or motorbike taxi, makes sure you agree the price before hopping on board.

Young, fresh coconuts are much more refreshing than water, great if you are spending the day on the beach or suffering from a hangover.

Although the tap water is drinkable in large cities, it is best to stick to bottled water. The larger bottles of UV treated water are the cheapest, although not the healthiest. It is worth paying a few baht more for brands such as Singha or IO.

In Bangkok, the entire city becomes gridlocked during peak commuting hours of 8-10 am and 5-7 pm. It is best to try to avoid travelling at these times.

Essentials such as suntan lotion and mosquito spray tend to be a little bit more expensive on the islands, so it is a good idea to stock up before you go. Internet access is often much more expensive as well.

Guesthouse owners a generally a good source of local information, it is worth getting to know them.

Make sure you check the expiry date of your visa carefully as there is an overstay fine of 500 baht per day.

Many bathrooms do not provide toilet tissue, so it is a good idea to carry some with you. Remember to throw it into the bucket provided rather than into the toilet.
 
Sarongs are an essential item as they dry much quicker than towels and can also be used as a blanket, a privacy screen and an item of clothing.

Learning a few words in Thai can go a long way to getting what you want and forming friendships. Compliments and jokes are always effective.

It is a good idea to carry a photocopy of your passport, especially when going out drinking as police perform random checks and may ask to see it.

It’s easy to become dehydrated, make sure you carry water and drink small sips frequently.

If you need to get away from the heat for a while, cinemas, expensive hotels and even 7/11 shops provide sanctuary.

A small dab of perfume or aftershave under your nose is a great way to avoid suffering from bad smells.

No Smoking and No Littering

Littering and Smoking“The only thing to do with good advice is to pass it on. It is never of any use to oneself.” Oscar Wilde 1856-1900, British Author. Early evening and marooned amongst the Friday night madness of Siam Square’s “beautiful people” and throat choking traffic, there was only one way I was going to get a much needed beer Chang within the hour……head for the Klong! Whether you’re heading to or from Khao San Road (KSR), and as long as it’s before 7 pm, you should bear in mind the Klong (canal) boat taxis as a great alternative when wishing to explore the city as they have natural air-conditioning, there are no traffic jams and they are dead cheap. What more could you ask for?

From under the bridge just behind the Discovery Centre, Siam Square I arrived at Banglamphoo Pier (located under the bridge between the Queens Gallery and Golden Mount) refreshed and wide awake; after ducking under the low bridges along the way, in under 10 minutes for 5 baht.

After a ten minute walk, passing democracy monument, I was seated on KSR with Chang in hand, beer snacks ordered and unfortunately an all too familiar sight these days….. A young smoker (no, not the green kind) being escorted to the cop shop on the back of a police motorcycle.

NO, this is not going to be an account of my usual Friday night walkabout, but instead a much need reminder for all. Whether you’re back in the kingdom again for some more fun this year or are here to leave your mark for the first time, take note because THINGS HAVE CHANGED!

Although it is not obviously apparent in most areas around the city, especially along KSR, there is a very hefty littering penalty in Thailand (take note of the yellow peril below) which conveniently goes hand in hand with the Government’s Anti-Smoking regulations. Briefly, for the uninformed, smoking is prohibited in ALL public buildings and also “supposedly” in air-conditioned establishments (i.e. bars, clubs & restaurants).

Littering and SmokingYes, I imagine right about now you’re looking around Khao San and thinking, well hey, I don’t see any such rules down here, but go tell that to the dude who stubbed out his cigarette on the ground while at the ATM. He was seen by a local motorcycle patrol officer and taken off to the cop shop; amidst applause from the misunderstood along the way, to be fined. The guy had no idea what he’d done wrong or what was going on. Unnecessary negativity on what may have been his first night out on KSR.

I speak from experience, there’s no way of getting out of it once you’ve been seen littering; in particular easily seen glowing cigarette stubs, so bear in mind that the fine you’ll have to fork out is anything up 2,000 Baht should you get caught. What’s the solution? Basically think twice before you trash anything in the street. Just remember that there’s a heap of restaurants and bars with ashtrays along KSR and litter bins around the city so be cool and make the effort, after all 2,000 Baht buys a lot of fun in the kingdom right?

And remember…..

Keepitreal.