Tag - taboo

Dos and Don’ts in Malaysia


Dos and Don'ts in Malaysia
Dos and Don'ts in Malaysia
Dos and Don'ts in Malaysia

Malaysia receives a large number of tourists and the Malay people are used to the different habits of foreigners. Although Malay people tend to be tolerant to cultural differences, it is important to remember that this is a conservative country and you should show respect by trying to follow the established customs. While some customs may sound a little bit complicated at first, simply observe the behaviour of other people and all will become clear.
Clothing
The people of Malaysia generally dress conservatively by Western standards, and showing too much skin in public is sure to cause offense. Although the high temperatures and humidity levels throughout the country may make visitors want to strip off, it is best to wear long, loose clothing at all times. Wearing shoes indoors is also considered to be rude, and visitors will usually notice a place to put shoes just outside temples and private houses.

Greetings
Malaysian people usually greet each other with a salam, which is a type of handshake that it made with both hands. When greeting someone for the first time, the protocol is for you to stretch out your hands in greeting. The other person will touch your outstretched hands, and then bring them to their chest in a gesture that means “I greet you from my heart”. Now it is the visitor’s turn to return the gesture. In some cases, someone may offer to shake hands instead, although this isn’t common and shouldn’t be initiated.

Eating etiquette
Eating etiquette is important in Malaysia and varies depending on the type of food you are eating. While Malay and Indian food is usually eaten with the right hand (never the left, as it is considered to be unclean), chopsticks tend to be used to eat Chinese food. Those who prefer to use cutlery than their right hand will be supplied with a spoon and a fork. Knives are not commonly used here, as most dishes feature pieces of meal that are small enough to scoop into your mouth without cutting them first.

Showing Affection
People rarely show affection in public, aside from the traditional salam greeting, and kissing and holding hands when in a public area is sure to cause embarrassment to onlookers and attract unwanted attention.

A List of Dos and Don’ts in Thailand

Dos and Don'tsThai culture, like other cultures, has its taboos as well as conventions. We invite you to help each other and learn from each others’ mistakes. Tell us about your experiences, give advice, and learn from others. These comments provided by Mike at ethailand.

DO ensure you have adequate travel insurance and that it covers both medical treatment and unexpected losses/expenses/theft.

DON’T carry anything through customs for anyone else unless you know the contents. Penalties for drug trafficking are severe.

DO follow common sense health precautions and check with your local doctor on current vaccination recommendations for travelling within Thailand.

DO take care of your valuables at all times and report any loss immediately to the nearest tourist police office.

DON’T buy gemstones or jewellery unless it is from a reputable dealer. Many sophisticated scams have sprung up over recent years. Whether the tout is dressed as a student, a monk or a policeman, identity card and all deal only with a registered gemstone dealer.

DO be careful with your passport. Be on guard against pickpockets or inadvertent loss.

DON’T overstay. Fines are imposed for each day you stay in Thailand beyond the date of the visa expiry, currently Baht 200 per day.

DO be careful when driving in Thailand. Only use car hire companies which offer full insurance coverage.

DO dress in a manner fitting to local custom and sensibilities.

DO respect Thai customs. While Thais are generally forgiving towards visitors disrepect towards images of Buddha or the Royal Family will not be tolerated.