Tag - swamps

Bako National Park, Malaysia

bako_national_park_1
Bako National Park, Malaysia

Situated in Sarawak in East Malaysia, the large and lively Bako National Park is a great place to spend a day or two. With 27 square kilometres of dense rainforest and a number of beautiful beaches, this is one of the real highlights of Malaysia. Bako National Park officially opened in 1957 and is home to a diverse range of animals such as monitor lizards, long-tailed macaques, plantain squirrels and silver leaf monkeys. Visitors who are blessed with keen eyesight and a little luck may be able to catch a glimpse of the rare and weird looking proboscis monkey, which features a bulbous nose and can sometimes be spotted up in the treetops. Well-worn jungle trails also lead visitors past a diverse range of flora and fauna, while those who want to view the park from a different perspective can wander along the elevated wooden walkway.

As you explore the national park you will have the opportunity to discover a number of different habitats. The park is comprised of vegetation from seven complete eco-systems, namely beach vegetation, cliff vegetation, kerangas, mangrove forest, mixed dipterocarp forest, grasslands vegetation and peat swamp forest.

Visitors can stay at Bako National Park overnight in one of the bungalows or dorm rooms. Spending the night is a good option for those who want to go on a guided night hike, while waking up in the wilderness is an awe-inspiring experience. The best times to spot wildlife are just before dusk and dawn, so staying the night is the best option to get the most out of this unique experience.

While you’re in the area, take a boat trip to the nearby island of Palau Lakai for fantastic views. This tiny island is unpopulated and offers the perfect deserted island experience.

To get to Bako National Park you will need to take a boat ride from the nearby village of Kampung, which serves as an interesting introduction to the area. Although you are free to explore alone, it is a good idea to hire a guide to make sure you catch all the highlights of the park.

Location and History of Malaysia


Location and History of Malaysia
Location and History of Malaysia
Location and History of Malaysia

Covering 329,847 square kilometres, Malaysia is situated in Southeast Asia and is bordered by Thailand, to the north, Indonesia and Singapore to the south, and Brunei and the Philippines to the east. Malaysia is divided into two separate land masses – known as Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo – by the South China Sea.

Malaysia has a tropical climate, with a hot summer and intense rainy season. With forest and mountain ranges running through the country from north to south, there are mangrove swamps and mudflats on the west coast, which separate into bays and inlets. There are a number of beautiful beaches on the west coast as well as dense forests to explore.

Malaysia’s modern history dates back to the 2nd century AD, when there were a collection of up to 30 separate Malay kingdoms. The Malay kingdoms gained power and riches as costal city ports, which were established in the 10th century. Originally Hindu or Buddhist states, Islamic found a place in Malaysia in the 14th century.

The Sultanate of Malacca was established at the start of the 15th century by prince Parameswara, from Palembang, who fled to the area from what is now known as Singapore. Prince Parameswara turned Malacca into an important trading port, putting Malaysia firmly on the map. However, Malacca was conquered by Portugal in 1511 and a Portuguese colony was established there.

In 1786 Britain established a colony in the Malay Peninsula, with the British East India Company leasing the island of Penang from the Sultan of Kedah. The Anglo-Dutch Treaty was signed in 1824, which divided the Malaya archipelago between Britain and the Netherlands.

Although there were Malaysian figureheads, the British mostly ruled Malaysia until the Japanese occupation during WWII. The Federation of Malaya was established in 1948, which reinstated the independence of the rulers of the Malay states under British protection.

From 1948 to 1960 the Communist Party of Malaya embarked on a guerrilla campaign known as the Malayan Emergency from 1948 to 1960 to force the British out of Malaya. Independence for the Federation within the Commonwealth was finally granted on 31 August 1957, and the Federation was renamed Malaysia in 1963.

At first there was much fighting with Indonesia over boundary lines, culmination in the racial riots of 1969. The New Economic Policy was established to restore peace to the country and since then Malaysia’s various ethnic groups have lived more or less in harmony.  

These days Malaysia’s economic and social structures are good and the country’s affluence can be seen in modern structures such as Kuala Lumpur’s Petronas Twin Towers and the Sepang F1 Circuit.

Ranong, Thailand

Ranong, Thailand
Ranong, Thailand
Ranong, Thailand
Ranong, Thailand

Ranong is a province located on the western coast of south Thailand. Located 568 kilometres from Bangkok, is next to the Myanmar border, and many people cross from Ranong into Myanmar. However, Ranong is an area of intense natural beauty, and there are many reasons to pause here for awhile. Indeed, many visitors plan to stop over for the night and extend their stay for several days.

Ranong Province is known for having the highest rainfall of all Thailand and its rainy season lasts for about 8 months, as apposed to three or four months of relatively light rainfall in much of the rest of the country. This means that the rest of the year Ranong is particularly beautiful, blessed with waterfalls, sun kissed islands, pristine national parks and unspoiled mangrove forests.

Affirmed as a national park in 1983, Laem Son National Park should be top of the list for visitors to Ranong Province as it contains more than 20 pretty islands, mangrove swamps, birds, fish, deer and monkeys. Key attractions in the park are Hat Bang Ben, which is particularly good for swimming, the friendly island of Koh Phayam and Koh Kam Yai, where you can camp or stay in a beach bungalow. Koh Kam Yai is a great place to stay if you like snorkelling, while you can watch sea turtles lay their eggs on the beautiful beach of Hat Praphat.

Another area of natural beauty is the Khlong Phrao National Park, which is near the pretty waterfall known as Namtok Ngao and the Ngao Mangrove Forest Research Centre. Also worth exploring are the Punyaban Falls, which are a good place to swim after trekking through the forest.

With only 18 homes on the entire island, Koh Chang is a very peaceful island just waiting to be explored, while the Ranong Mineral Hot Springs are revered for their sacred water, which is believed to have healing powers and is certainly a great place to ease aching muscles after a day or two of exploring.

The live-aboard diving trips offered in this area offer a new type of experience to people who love diving and snorkelling, while you can climb to the top of Khao Fa Chi for an excellent view of the area.