Tag - sanam luang

Bangkok, Thailand


Bangkok, Thailand
Bangkok, Thailand
Bangkok, Thailand
Bangkok, Thailand

Bangkok is Thailand’s bustling capital city. The city is commonly called Krungthep in Thai, whilst the full name; Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Yuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit has earnt the city a place in The Guinness Book of Records. In English, the name translates as; The city of angels, the great city, the eternal jewel city, the impregnable city of God Indra, the grand capital of the world endowed with nine precious gems, the happy city, abounding in an enormous Royal Palace that resembles the heavenly abode where reigns the reincarnated god, a city given by Indra and built by Vishnukam.

Bangkok is perhaps one of the most spectacular capital cities in Southeast Asia, if not the world. There is no limit to what can be seen, done and experienced in this immense city of colourful contradictions where gentle traditional beliefs meet the fast pace of capitalism and everything is tempered by the uniquely Thai sense of style and priority.

Many first time visitors to Bangkok find it overwhelming as there is simply so much to see and do and every area offers a new and interesting aspect of this city, which somehow manages to be simultaneously vast and quite compact.

A great way to get to know the city is the take a ferry along the Chao Phraya River. The river stops at many different piers and there are a whole host of famous sites right on the river bank, which can be explored or simply viewed from the ferry. Look out for the Grand Palace, Wat Pho, and Wat Arun, whilst China Town and Khaosan Road are just a short walk from their piers.

The central pier connects with the Skytrain or BTS, and this is another great way to see the city. The Skytrain soars over Lumpini Park and stops at Siam, where you can find the large shiny shopping centres of MBK, Siam Paragon and The Discovery Center.

If you are interested in shopping, make sure you pay a visit to the famous Chatuchak Weekend Market, while the Night Bazaar at Sanam Luang is a great place to pick up a bargain whilst avoiding the heat of the day.

Bangkok is well known for its rich and varied nightlife, which covers just about every possible style and trend. For those interested in go-go bars head to areas such as Soi Cowboy, Nana Plaza or witness an eyebrow raising show in Patpong. There are plenty of stylish clubs, and the area known as RCA contains dozens of different clubs catering for every style of music. Along the banks of the

river you will find dozens of bars in which to enjoy a cold drink and look at the stars, while in Sukhumvit you will find a number of Western-style theme pubs.

If the pace and pollution of the city get a bit much, there are plenty of city parks to get away from the traffic and relax for a while. Among the best are the enormous centrally located Lumpini Park, Chatuchak Park and Suan Rot Fai (Railway Park), where you can hire a bicycle or watch the butterflies in the insectarium.

More than Muay Thai

Aside from Thailand’s obsession with English Premier League football and the ever popular “Muay Thai” (Thai Boxing), the Kingdom has a variety of home grown “sports” enjoyed by Thais in their own very special way. 

takrawTakraw

Said to have originated in southern Thailand, which is probably why the Malays play it too, this competitive and truly acrobatic team sport involves knocking a light weight ball, made from Ratan, back and forth over a badminton net. This highly skillful game is all about speed, acrobatics and for me, the defiance of gravity as aside from their hands players can use any other part of the body to keep the ball up and launch it back over the net. Matrix style moves are common place as players often somersault in the air to kick the ball. Friendly “knock ups” can be seen everywhere with players standing around in circles, heading, kicking and keeping the ball aloft. However, if you want to see some serious bouts, visit either the National Stadium or the Hua Mak Stadium.

Kitefighting in ThailandKite Fighting

Kite flying, “chak-wow jula” is enjoyed not only in Bangkok, but all over the Kingdom between March to May each year. However, during this period the serious business of “kite fighting” competition in Bangkok is focused on Sanam Luang (the large open area beside the Grand Palace) where at weekends spectators will see amazingly hand crafted kites of various shapes, sizes, colours and designs in aerial combat. Funnily enough, these airborne battles match “male” and “female” kites up against each other with the winner knocking their opponent out of the sky! 

fish_fightingFish Fighting

The beautiful, but raving mad, Siamese fighting fish, locally known as “Pla Gat”, has been cross bred so much that aside from its stumpy looking fins and the fact that it will insanely attack its own reflection, it is not easy to identify one from an ordinary fighting fish. Nevertheless, once bets are placed on this widespread local sport, competition between combatants couldn’t be simpler with two male fish placed into a glass jar and thereafter must fight to the death or at least until one tries to do a runner! Although most fights are typically over within minutes, some victories have been known to take hours. 

Bull Fighting in ThailandThai Bull Fighting

Down in Hat Yai local farmers have their own, safer, form of bull fighting. Unlike the deadly Spanish style, Thai farmers simply get their bulls to “lock-horns”, in a test of strength with the winner being the animal still standing in the centre of the ring or the one that hasn’t fled. Almost comically, in a well matched contest you will see owners actually giving their bulls a helping hand, push and even a kick up the backside! You can catch the action on the first Saturday of each month at the Khlong Wa Stadium. 

Makruk Thai ChessMak Ruk (Thai Chess)

“Mak Ruk” is more like the western style chess game rather than the Chinese one. Although the object of the game is the same; to get checkmate, it’s played a lot faster than its western counterpart. In general, the size of the “Mak Ruk” board, the number of pieces and the rules of capture are the same. Kings cannot castle and aside from the queens and bishops, which can only move one square, all other pieces move in the same ways as those in the western style of the game. Mak Ruk is enjoyed by all Thais with games commonly seen all over the kingdom. 

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