Tag - motorbikes

Pai, Thailand

Pai, Thailand
Pai, Thailand
Pai, Thailand

Pai, Thailand

Located halfway between Chiang Mai and Mae Hong Son, Pai is an intimate little village which draws visitors from all over the world with its cool climate, friendly locals and stunning scenery, which includes mountains and waterfalls.

As soon as you arrive in Pai, the fresh mountain air and warm smiles make you feel at home and slow your pace a little. The absolutely stunning scenery is just waiting to be explored, and many people hire bicycles or motorbikes and ride out to the nearby hill tribe villages. The village of Ban Piang Luang makes a good day trip, and the local people are welcoming. Pai has a total population of less than 3,000 people, which gives a real feeling of community, a nice contrast after spending some time in one of Thailand’s bustling cities or busy beach areas.

There are many tiny hill tribe villages located around Pai and hill tribes include Karen, Hmong, Lisu and Lahu. Although usually quite used to tourists by now, many of the hill tribe villagers are shy and should be approached respectfully.

The village of Pai takes its name from the river that runs through the lush valley. There are a few local temples to explore, including the very pretty Wat Luang and Wat Klang and the beautiful forests make a great setting for a soak in the Tha Pai Hot Springs, where you can choose to bath in the incredibly hot water (which can reach scorching temperatures of 200 degrees Celsius) with friends, or treat yourself to a private pool.

Originally a quiet market village inhabited by Shan people, Pai has adapted to provide a haven for the road weary traveler.

The water in Pai is cool and clear, and the waters at Mo Paeng Waterfall are a good place to cool down after a walk through the countryside or a visit at one of the nearby elephant camps.

For shopping, check out the Wednesday Market, when colorful crowds of local villagers and tribal people from all around the Pai Valley gather to trade their wares.

But the main past time in Pai is simply chilling out. With a large variety of guest houses, restaurants, bars and cinema rooms, this is a perfect place to learn the art of relaxation.

Transport in Thailand

Transport in Thailand
Transport in Thailand
Transport in Thailand
Transport in Thailand

Outside Bangkok, there are fewer transport options and in many places you need to have your own transport. However, motorbikes and bicycles can be found in most places and are cheap to hire.

Motorcycle taxis are usually available in most parts of Thailand, even in small towns. Look out for clusters of young men wearing orange jackets with numbers printed on the back in Thai. Remember to agree the price before you get on the back of the motorbike.

Meter taxis are usually only available in large cities such as Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Pattaya and Phuket. In the rest of the country many interesting alternatives are available.

Buses are available throughout Thailand. However, outside Bangkok the destinations are rarely printed in English and you cannot expect the conductor to speak English. The best way to make sure that you arrive at you destination is to ask someone (preferably at a travel agency or tourist cafe) to write the address in Thai and teach you how to pronounce it correctly. Also, most buses fill up quickly and are crammed to bursting point. In order to guarantee a seat, get on at a bus station.

Intercity Coaches are a fine, cheap way to travel around Thailand. The good road system means that they are quite comfortable and travel between most cities, large towns and tourist destinations. Much cheaper than the train (a journey of 220 kilometres costs around 90 Baht) as with local buses it is best to embark at the bus station to guarantee a seat.

Songthaew means ‘two rows’ in Thai, referring to the two rows of wooden benches that line the walls of these small, open-backed mini vans. Very common in small towns and villages, songthaews follow a designated route which is not always obvious. It is best to flag down the driver, state where you want to go and add the word ‘mai?’ to the end. Fares typically cost between 6 and 20 baht.

Saburus are a more modern and comfortable version of the songthaew, with padded seats. Expect to pay about double the price of a songthaew, although many people say the comfort is worth the extra few baht.

Known as Samlaews, these are the same as the bicycle rickshaw, which can be found all over India. Not exactly the fastest or most comfortable form of transport and only recommended for short journeys, although they can be a nice way to get to know a place or enjoy a romantic sunset ride.