Tag - democracy monument

No Smoking and No Littering

Littering and Smoking“The only thing to do with good advice is to pass it on. It is never of any use to oneself.” Oscar Wilde 1856-1900, British Author. Early evening and marooned amongst the Friday night madness of Siam Square’s “beautiful people” and throat choking traffic, there was only one way I was going to get a much needed beer Chang within the hour……head for the Klong! Whether you’re heading to or from Khao San Road (KSR), and as long as it’s before 7 pm, you should bear in mind the Klong (canal) boat taxis as a great alternative when wishing to explore the city as they have natural air-conditioning, there are no traffic jams and they are dead cheap. What more could you ask for?

From under the bridge just behind the Discovery Centre, Siam Square I arrived at Banglamphoo Pier (located under the bridge between the Queens Gallery and Golden Mount) refreshed and wide awake; after ducking under the low bridges along the way, in under 10 minutes for 5 baht.

After a ten minute walk, passing democracy monument, I was seated on KSR with Chang in hand, beer snacks ordered and unfortunately an all too familiar sight these days….. A young smoker (no, not the green kind) being escorted to the cop shop on the back of a police motorcycle.

NO, this is not going to be an account of my usual Friday night walkabout, but instead a much need reminder for all. Whether you’re back in the kingdom again for some more fun this year or are here to leave your mark for the first time, take note because THINGS HAVE CHANGED!

Although it is not obviously apparent in most areas around the city, especially along KSR, there is a very hefty littering penalty in Thailand (take note of the yellow peril below) which conveniently goes hand in hand with the Government’s Anti-Smoking regulations. Briefly, for the uninformed, smoking is prohibited in ALL public buildings and also “supposedly” in air-conditioned establishments (i.e. bars, clubs & restaurants).

Littering and SmokingYes, I imagine right about now you’re looking around Khao San and thinking, well hey, I don’t see any such rules down here, but go tell that to the dude who stubbed out his cigarette on the ground while at the ATM. He was seen by a local motorcycle patrol officer and taken off to the cop shop; amidst applause from the misunderstood along the way, to be fined. The guy had no idea what he’d done wrong or what was going on. Unnecessary negativity on what may have been his first night out on KSR.

I speak from experience, there’s no way of getting out of it once you’ve been seen littering; in particular easily seen glowing cigarette stubs, so bear in mind that the fine you’ll have to fork out is anything up 2,000 Baht should you get caught. What’s the solution? Basically think twice before you trash anything in the street. Just remember that there’s a heap of restaurants and bars with ashtrays along KSR and litter bins around the city so be cool and make the effort, after all 2,000 Baht buys a lot of fun in the kingdom right?

And remember…..

Keepitreal.

Wat Saket – the Golden Mount


Wat Saket near Khao an Road, Bangkok, Thailand
Wat Saket near Khao San Road, Bangkok, Thailand
Wat Saket near Khao San Road,Bangkok, Thailand
Wat Saket near Khao San Road, Bangkok, Thailand
Wat Saket near Khao San Road, Bangkok, Thailand
Wat Saket near Khao San Road, Bangkok, Thailand

I love everything about living in Bangkok: the hustle and bustle, the strange sights, even the strong smells. However, there are times when city life becomes overwhelming and I need to find somewhere to retreat for a while to soothe my senses. Whenever I feel this way, my thoughts turn first to Wat Saket, known as the Golden Mount; a large temple with a towering gilded chedi atop a hill situated just a ten-minute walk from Khao San Road.

It is nearly dusk and I find myself climbing the 318 steps that wrap themselves around the smooth white sides of Wat Saket. I find the staircase rather steep and I have to pause occasionally to get my breath back, trying to look as though I am simply enjoying the view. The Golden Mount was once the highest point in Bangkok. After being used to the flatness of Bangkok, the 80-meter climb can be rather challenging and I am glad to be tackling it during the cooler part of the day.

At three points, the stairs are broken by a short platform, and I pause on one of these to ring the large prayer bells. Striking the bells produces a deep, majestic tone, which resonates and carries out into the distance.

At the top of the stairs, I pause to take off my shoes and catch my breath, then enter the circular structure of the temple. Before climbing to the very top, I make my way into the center, where four niches mark the points of the compass and each hold a statue of Lord Buddha.

The center of the Golden Mount is lit by candles and smells strongly of wax and incense. The combined effect of the soft lighting and the heady scent makes me feel reverent and I pause to pay respect to each statue before continuing. This part of the temple contains some of the Buddha relics that were discovered in 1897 under the ruins of Pipraawaa near the frontier of Nepal.

Once I have slowly circled the centre of the temple I put my coin in the collection box and climb the short wooden ladder to the top. As I pass through a doorway, I am outside once more, the cool, fresh wind serving as my reward for having made the climb. The view from the top is spectacular – I can see right across Bangkok to the imposing structure of Biyoke Tower. Nearby the Chao Phraya river sparkles, spanned by the magnificent structure of the Rama IV Bridge.

At the base of Wat Saket, I can see the center of the temple compound, where a giant golden Buddha statue is housed in a bot – an open house-like structure – that has been extensively restored. The Buddha statue is situated in the samaadhi (contemplation) attitude with a disciple seated either side.

Situated in an enclosure at the front of the bot is a cutting of the sacred Bodhi tree, which was brought from Anuraadhapura in Northern Sri Lanka in 1818. This cutting is believed to be a grafting of the original Bodhi tree from Gaya in India where Lord Buddha achieved enlightenment. It is an honour to study and meditate at Wat Saket and the grounds contain accommodation for over 300 monks.

Wat Saket has a rich and interesting history. The temple’s full name is Wat Saket Ratcha Wora Maha Wihan, and it was commissioned in the late 18th century by King Rama I, making it one of the oldest temples in Bangkok.

The golden chedi was commissioned in 1800 by King Rama III. He wanted to build a replica of the large golden pagoda in the former capital of Ayudhaya, but the ground was too soft and the temple collapsed. The structure was left until the reign of King Rama ordered the restructuring of the temple and 1,000 teak logs to shore the temple and prevent it from sinking once more. During World War II, the Golden Mount was graced with concrete walls to prevent it from collapsing and extensive maintenance is carried out to keep the structure looking
pristine. The sun is starting to set as I descend from the Golden Mount. Before I leave, I pause and sit for awhile in the wooden gazebo placed halfway down the mount.Wat Saket is located near Democracy Monument on the Boriphat and Lan Luand Road Intersection.

The wat is open daily 8 am- 5 pm and although entrance is free admission to the chedi costs 10B, have a coin ready.The best time to visit is early morning or near closing, when the time to the top is cooler. During late October to Mid November Wat Saket comes alive the celebrate Bangkok’s temple fair. The festival lasts for nine days and features theatrical performances, circus shows, foods and souvenir stalls.

Getting There:

You can easily walk to the Golden Mount from Khao San Road. Simply walk to the Gulliver’s end and follow the road round to the right. You will now be on Ratchadamnoen Klang, a busy main road, with Democracy Monument in the center. Walk straight down the road and as you pass McDonald’s on your right you will see the Golden Mount up ahead.

About the author:

Kirsty Turner (Kay) is a freelance writer currently living in Bangkok. She has kindly agreed to write for KhaoSanRoad.com and share her love of all things Thai and, especially, all things Khao San Road!