Tag - canal

Chumphon, Thailand

Chumphon, Thailand
Chumphon, Thailand
Chumphon, Thailand
Chumphon, Thailand

Blessed with warm welcomes, good food and pretty palm groves, Chumphon is one of Thailand’s southern provinces and features more than 200 kilometres of seashore, picturesque beaches, nearby islands, sparkling waterfalls and caves to explore. This province is ideal for those who seek relaxation amongst beauty away from the tourist and backpacker scene.

A big attraction in the area is Hat Tha Wua Laen, which is a good place for windsurfing and kiteboarding, whilst the beach of Hat Sai Ri is a good place to arrange day trips to the surrounding islands.

A big attraction in the area is Hat Tha Wua Laen, which is a good place for windsurfing and kiteboarding, whilst the beach of Hat Sai Ri is a good place to arrange day trips to the surrounding islands.

There are a large number of enchanting tropical islands just waiting to be explored in this amazing province. Many people hire a boat and take a tour of several islands all in one day, combining the trip with snorkelling in the crystal clear waters and sunbathing on the beach. Some great islands to explore include Koh Phithak, Koh Ngam Yai and Koh Ngam Noi, the limestone island of Koh Thalu, Koh Mattra and Koh Chorakhe, which means Crocodile Island in the Thai language.

There are some spectacularly beautiful national parks in the area, including the Mu Ko Chumphon National Park and Khlong Phrao National Park. Most of the tiny islands feature waterfalls nestled in the jungles, which are extremely beautiful and great for swimming in. Look out for Namtok Heo Lom, Namtok Thap Chang, and the incredible Namtok Kapo Forest Park.

Caving enthusiasts will not be disappointed as there are a large number of interesting caves to explore including Tham Thip Prida, Tham Thong and the Tham Khao Phlu Wildlife Conservation Area. Visitors can also combining the caving experience with relaxation at the Tham Khao Plu Hot Spring, which actually contains three hot springs of various temperatures all with a lush jungle backdrop to enjoy while you soak and receive the healing benefits of the natural mineral waters.

The mountain of Khao Chao Mueang provides spectacular views over the area, while the adventurous can take a trip to explore the pretty winding canal network with Phato Canal Rafting.

Although generally quite peaceful, the area comes alive in April to celebrate the Chumphon Marine Festival. The main focus of the festival is the Windsurfing Competition, which takes place at Hat Tha Wua Laen. There is also a marathon and exhibits of folk art, dancing and beach barbecues.

Also worth looking out for is the Lang Suan Buddha Image Parade and Boat Race Festival. The festival features a procession of temple boats and a boat race on Mae Nam Lang Suan, which is situated 60 kilometres to the south of Chumphon.

Nakhon Nayok, Thailand

Nakhon Nayok, Thailand
Nakhon Nayok, Thailand
nakhon_nayok_3
Nakhon Nayok, Thailand

Welcome to Nakhon Nayok Province, an ancient site of the Dvaravati civilisation, which dates back more than 900 years. The province capital, Nakhon Nayok town was originally established as an eastern fort town of Ayutthaya during the reign of King U Thong and is located 106 kilometres from Bangkok.

There is a lot in Nakhon Nayak for lovers of nature to see and explore. The northern part of the province is situated amongst the colossal Dong Phaya Yen mountain range, and most of that area is covered by the lush green jungle of the spectacularly beautiful Khao Yai National Park.

In the central part of the province you will find the flowing waters of the Nakhon Nayok River. There are many opportunities to hire various kinds of boats around the area as this river is perfect for kayaking and canoeing. You can take out kayaks and canoes for the entire day and use your craft to explore the narrow tributaries at Khlong Wang Takhrai, which lead through a vast coffee plantation.

A short bus ride away from town is the Wang Takhrai Botanical Garden and the popular Wang Takhrai waterfall. There are also many other waterfalls to discover in the province such as Nam Tok Nang Rong, the nine-tiered Sarika waterfall and also the stunning Lan Rak waterfall. Another beautiful waterfall is Nam Tok Heo Narok, where the water cascades from a 200 metre cliff.

For those interested in the rich history of the area, a visit to the Dong Lakhon Ancient City should be high on the agenda. Located 9 kilometres south of the town, this is an ancient town of the Dvaravati period (about 6th-13th centuries). Don’t forget to pay a visit to the local museum to discover more about the area’s interesting past and to see well labelled displays of ancient Buddha images.

Worth looking out for are the long awaited Nakhon Nayok Canoe Races, which commence at the Wang Takhrai Canal Bridge in Tambon Sarika and end in the Nakhon Nayok River near the provincial capital, a distance of 5 kilometres. The races take place at various times throughout the year and tourists are welcome to join in the fun and try to beat the local contestants.

Loy Krathong – of Light and Water


Loy Krathong - of Light and Water
Loy Krathong - of Light and Water
Loy Krathong - of Light and Water
Loy Krathong - of Light and Water
Loy Krathong - of Light and Water

“November full moon shines, Loy Krathong, Loy Krathong, And the water’s high in the river and local klong, Loy Loy Krathong, Loy Loy Krathong, Loy Krathong is here and everybody’s full of cheer, We’re together at the klong, Each one with his krathong, As we push away we pray, We can see a better day.”

This is an English translation of the song sung by Thai students to celebrate Loy Krathong.

Quite the opposite of Songkran, Loy Krathong is by far my favourite Thai festival. In Thai, Loy means “to float”, whilst krathong is the name of the small lotus-shaped rafts, which are specially constructed for the occasion. Loy Krathong is held on the evening of the full moon of the 12th month in the lunar calendar. This usually falls in November and is celebrated this year (2007) on November 24th. Loy Krathong is long anticipated all over Thailand and especially in Bangkok, where people gather in their thousands on the banks of the Chao Phraya River and take boat trips along the intricate canal network.

Last year, I took a small ferry boat across the Chao Phraya River after dark. The sun had only just set, yet there, near the Phra Pinklao Bridge, several hundreds of people had already gathered.

I walked around the small park area, where groups of people had gathered to celebrate together. Folding metal tables and chairs had been set up everywhere, the tabletops already covered with bottles of Sangsom whiskey, glasses and buckets of ice. All around, stalls were set up selling krathongs in every size and colour, fireworks, toys and even baby turtles as many people believe that it is good luck to release turtles into the river during festivals.

At around 8 pm the boat parade began. I found a spot on the river bank and watched in awe as about two dozen elaborately decorated barges glided down the river. Each barge was strewn with coloured lights and decorated in a certain theme. Of particular note was a barge bearing an enormous saxophone, a tribute to His Majesty the King’s musical talent.

There was a spectacular fireworks display at the end of the parade. Several children joined in by firing tubes containing small rockets into the air with reckless abandon.

Then it was time for me to launch my krathong. I patiently waited my turn at the water’s edge, then lit the candle and incense sticks in the center and lightly placed my krathong on the water, making a wish as I did so. Many people believe that their wish will come true if their candle continues burning until the krathong is out of sight.

I watched in wonder as my krathong drifted into the river and weaved amongst the hundreds of others already floating there. The flickering lights of the candles on the water created a magical atmosphere.

The Loy Krathong festival dates back about 700 years. Coinciding with the end of the rainy season and the rice harvest, it is a way of apologizing for polluting the water. Thai people float a krathong on the water to thank the Goddess of Water, Phra Mae Khongkha. The act of floating away the candle raft sybolises letting go of anger and grudges so that a person can start life afresh.

Another symbol of Loy Krathong are the beautiful kom loy lanterns. As I wove my way across the park once more, I came across a group of students holding aloft one of these large paper lanterns and waiting for it to fill with air. When inflated, a candle was placed inside and the lantern was released, rising high into the air to become another flickering point of light.

Another interesting event during Loy Krathong are the beauty contests, known as “Noppamas Queen Contests” after the consort of the former king of Sukhothai, King Loethai. Noppamas is credited with starting the tradition of krathongs when her beautiful tribute caught the attention of the king as it drifted down the river. Loy Krathong is a great opportunity to experience a Thai festival. Whether you choose to do it simply as and onlooker or get fully involved, Thai people are extremely found of this festival and pleased to share the experience.

About the author:

Kirsty Turner (Kay) is a freelance writer currently living in Bangkok. She has kindly agreed to write for KhaoSanRoad.com and share her love of all things Thai and, especially, all things Khao San Road!