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Food and Drink in Malaysia

Food and Drink in Malaysia
Food and Drink in Malaysia
Food and Drink in Malaysia

Malaysia is a great place for people who love to eat and experiment with food. There are a wide range of Malay, Chinese and Indian dishes available through the country and some interesting mixtures of culinary styles. As you travel through Malaysia, look out for regional specialities and try to experience the full range of Malay cuisine.
Hawker stalls and coffee shops are good places to find a cheap and tasty meal. Hawker stalls tend to be very clean and open until late in the evening. Curry dishes and other meals in western style restaurants, while seafood restaurants serve fresh fish prepared in the Chinese style. For western food, head to the shopping malls, where you will usually find a large food court with a number of well known fast food restaurants.

Here is a selection of the numerous dishes you will find on your travels in Malaysia:

Nasi lemak – the most common Malaysian breakfast dish consists rice cooked in light coconut milk with anchovies, peanuts, a slice of cucumber and a little chilli.

Rendang – usually made with beef, this dry curry dish consists of stewed meat in a spicy curry paste.  

Chilli crab – a whole crab is covered with a generous amount of sticky, strong chilli sauce.

Laksa – this dish varies from place to place but is basically a coconut both with seafood or chicken.  

Bak chor mee – this noodle dish is cooked in a chilli-based sauce with minced pork, fried anchovies, vegetables and mushrooms.

Popiah – these delicious spring rolls can be either fried or raw. Filled with boiled turnips, fried tofu, fried shallots and garlic, chopped omelette, chopped stir fried long beans, there is usually a sweet chilli sauce to dip them in.  

Hainanese chicken rice – usually found on street stalls, this steamed chicken dish is served with special gently spiced rice and tasty ginger.

Bubur cha-cha – a traditional Malay desert with cubed yam, sweet potato and sago added to coconut milk soup.

Kuih – this sweet desert is made with coconut milk, coconut flesh and either glutinous rice or tapioca. It is often made into cute and colourful designs.

Avoid drinking tap water and drinks with ice in Malaysia. Bottled water is cheap and easy to find.  

Coffee – known as kopi – and tea – teh – are both popular and tasty drinks in Malaysia as well as a local variation known as teh tarik. Tea and coffee usually comes hot, with condensed milk to sweeten it. If you don’t want milk ask for teh o, while teh ais will get you iced milky tea.
Also popular is a drink known as kopi tongkat ali ginseng, which is a mixture of coffee, a local aphrodisiacal root and ginseng served with condensed milk.

Despite being a predominately Muslim country, alcohol is widely available throughout Malaysia. Beer and other alcohol can be bought in bars, restaurants and 7-11 shops. The local brew is tuak, which fermented rice wine that comes in many forms. Usually served lukewarm, tuak is often flavoured with sugar or honey.

Food and Drink in Thailand

Food and Drink in Thailand
Food and Drink in Thailand
Food and Drink in Thailand
Food and Drink in Thailand

Thai food: colourful, inexpensive, full of flavour, often spicy and always available – you just can’t beat it. There are five flavours which make up every Thai meal – hot (spicy), sweet, sour, salty and bitter. Thai people are very passionate about their food, and love nothing more than sitting down to a huge meal with family or friends. Usually, several dishes will be ordered at one time for people to share. Most visitors quickly become hooked on trying the hundreds of Thai dishes, which can be anything from extremely spicy vegetable salads, rich curries or incredibly sweet deserts.

Although each dish is different there are certain ingredients that are essential for Thai cuisine. Almost all dishes contain nam pla, a pungent and strong tasting fish sauce as well as shrimp paste, a combination of ground shrimp and salt. Most Thai dishes contain a range of chilies and spices as well as curry pastes, soy sauce, dried shrimp, Thai pepper, and roasted chili paste.

Vegetarian food can be found if you know what to ask for. If you tell a waitress you are vegetarian (mung-sawirat), they will usually be able to suggest vegetarian dishes. Fish and seafood is easy to find.

Here are some of the most popular Thai dishes which should not be missed.

Breakfast is very different to what is served in western countries and can take a little getting used to. There are two main breakfast dishes, Jok, a kind of rice porridge with pieces of meat, ginger and herbs and Khao Tom, a Thai style rice soup.

In Thailand, main meals can be eaten at any time of the day and are often enjoyed 3, 4 or even 5 times a day.

Khao Pad literally means friend rice and is very popular. It is usually made with chicken, beef, shrimp or pork.

Pad Thai is pan fried rice noodles with fish sauce, sugar, lime juice, chopped peanuts, and egg mixed with chicken, seafood, or tofu. Look out for carts selling this incredibly cheaply on Khaosan Road.

Tom yam is rather spicy and sour soup with meat. With shrimp it is called Tom yam goong or Tom yam kung with seafood. Eat this dish with rice to reduce the spiciness.
Tom kha gai is hot sweet soup with chicken and coconut milk.

Rad na is wide rice noodles in a thick gravy-like sauce with beef, pork, chicken, shrimp, or seafood.

Khao pad naem is found in the Northeast and is fried rice with fermented sausage.

Pad see ew is noodles stir-fried with thick soi sauce, fish sauce and pork or chicken.

Gai Pad Khing is chicken stir-fried with sliced ginger.

Red curry or gaeng phet meaning ‘hot curry’, is made with large amounts of dried red chillies.

Green curry or gaeng khiew-waan, meaning green curry, is made with fresh green chillies and Thai basil, chicken or fish balls. This dish is spicy, rich and creamy.

Massaman curry is an Indian style curry which is not quite as spicy as the Thai alternatives, containing roasted dried spices, chicken and potato.

Pad pak ruam – stir fried vegetables, great a vegetarian option or side dish.

Som tam is a fresh, spicy grated papaya salad, where the flavours are pounded with a mortar and pestle to combine them. Som tam poo is made with salted black crab, Som tam Thai has peanuts, dried shrimp and palm sugar and Som tam plara is from north eastern part of Thailand with salted gourami fish, white eggplants, fish sauce and long bean.

Larb are very spicy sour salads containing meat, onions, chillies, roasted rice powder and garnished with mint.

Yam is the name for any type of sour salad, such as those made with glass noodles.

There are a large selection of deserts available, all sweet and many involving banana or another fruit and coconut cream.

Kao niao ma muang is the world famous sticky rice and ripe mango.

Kao niao Durian is sticky rice and durian in coconut milk.

Gluay buad chee is banana in coconut milk.

Make sure you try Cha Yen – Thai Iced Tea and Kah-Feh Yen – Thai Iced Coffee. Very sweet and creamy, they can be a good way to cool down.

Although beer is widely available, most Thais choose to drink whiskey, sharing a bottle between the group and adding water and ice.

Essential Beer Snacks

  It doesn’t take visitors to the Kingdom long to find out that there’s a lot more on the menu here than Tom Yam Gung (Spicy Lemon Grass Prawn Soup) or an often life saving early morning Pad Thai (Thai Noodle Dish) from along KSR. However, while knocking down a few medicinal cold ones on KSR this weekend, I noticed the trouble is that unless it can be seen cooking or there is a picture of some food for visitors to point to, many great Thai beer snacks and dishes are never experienced.
Tom Yam Gung
  It doesn’t take visitors to the Kingdom long to find out that there’s a lot more on the menu here than (Spicy Lemon Grass Prawn Soup) or an often life saving early morning

som_tamHowever, while knocking down a few medicinal cold ones on KSR this weekend, I noticed the trouble is that unless it can be seen cooking or there is a picture of some food for visitors to point to, many great Thai beer snacks and dishes are never experienced.

So what are the Beer Essentials? Well we’ve had a think and have come up with our six of the best most commonly ordered bar food; both veg and non veg, to go with the laughing liquid of your choice.

Som Tam (Spicy Shredded Mango Salad) (veg) is made two ways. Som Tam Boo (with small crabs) and is a little sour or Som Tam Tai (with small dried shrimp) which is sweet.

Both are usually very very spicy (if you don’t ask for non spicy) and served cold with raw vegetables and Khao Neo (Sticky Rice). A truly great tasting Thai snack that goes well with just about anything.

moo_yangYam Moo Yang (Grilled Pork Salad) (non veg) 
A more western looking salad dish again made spicy (if you don’t ask for non spicy – “Mai Pet”), occasionally served warm and eaten on its own. Goes down a treat and can be made with beef or chicken as an alternative.

Gai Pad Med Mar Muang (Chicken & Cashew Nuts) (non veg)
A dish of small deep fried chicken pieces with spring onions, cashews and sun dried chillies (not spicy) served hot. Compliments any of the above salad dishes really well.

nua_thodMoo / Neua / Gai Thod (Deep Fried Pork, Beef or Chicken) (non veg)
A dish as simple as it sounds. Your choice of either deep fried pork, beef of chicken, not spicy at all, served hot and usually with a sweet chilly dip. A quick excellent snack to have with a cold beer and always tastes like more!

Yam Pla Duk FooPla Duk Foo (Deep Fried Shredded Catfish Salad) (Vegish)
Yeah, sounds a little over the top, but believe me once you’ve mixed up the traditional looking salad with the shredded cat fish and sauce, it’s a taste explosion that’s quite unique. It can take a short while to prepare, but its well worth the wait. Usually served cold, in large portions. A great dish to share with a friend.
 
moo_gai_manowMoo/ Gai Manow
(Grilled Pork/ Chicken in Lime, Chilli & Garlic) (non veg)
Commonly ordered with lean cuts of pork, but chicken breast cuts are a great alternative. Served warm with a few raw fresh vegetables, made a little spicy (if you don’t ask for non spicy – “Mai Pet”) and eaten just as it comes. A popular dish found on many Thai tables!

So there you go. The above are just a few Thai delights that you may well be missing out on, and at around 100 Baht a dish they’ll meet anyone’s budget. Enjoy.

And remember…

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