Tag - air-conditioning

Accommodation in Thailand

Hotels, Guest Houses and other Accommodation in Thailand
Hotels, Guest Houses and other Accommodation in Thailand
Hotels, Guest Houses and other Accommodation in Thailand
Hotels, Guest Houses and other Accommodation in Thailand

Thailand offers a wide range of accommodation options, from the flimsiest wooden shack to luxury, five star hotels. Generally, accommodation goes up by as much as a third during the peak tourist seasons and around two or three days before the full moon party on Koh Phangan. Opting for a room with a simple fan and cold water can save a lot of money, whilst luxuries such as power showers, air conditioning and satellite television are often available but don’t come cheap.

Here is an overview of what is available and how much you can expect to pay:

Beach Huts tend to be very rough and ready. If you are looking to save a few baht this might be a good place to hang your hat, although it is a good idea to keep your valuables in a separate safety deposit box – most places offering beach huts also have these. It is a good idea to make sure that your hut comes equipped with a mosquito net as insects come as standard. Prices start from as little as 50 baht per night for the most basic hut away from the beach to 1000 baht for a hut with a bathroom and ocean view.

Tents are another cheap option, especially if you are spending the night in a national park. You can generally get away with paying just 30 baht per night if you have your own tent, or tents can be hired for around 100 baht. Many camp sites have very limited facilities, so it is a good idea to bring your own provisions.

Bungalows are usually found in beach areas. They are generally more comfortable than beach huts as the mattress tends to be thicker and the amount of insects fewer. Most bungalows also have bathrooms, which saves you staggering into a tree in the middle of the night. Prices range from 150 baht for a basic bungalow with a fan and bathroom with cold water to around 500 baht for air conditioning.

River Rafts make an interesting way to view an area, especially if you are staying in a place with stunning scenery such as Kanchanaburi. Most river rafts have large wooden balconies where you can sit and watch the world go by. Expect to pay a minimum of 600 baht for a fan room on the river.

Guesthouses are generally very cheap and cheerful. Many are set up to cater for backpackers and you can get a basic room with a fan and shared bathroom for as little as 100 baht. Most guesthouses serve popular backpacker food such as French fries, pad thai and banana pancakes.

They usually have a communal garden or restaurant to chill out in, which can be a good place to meet other backpackers and swap tall tales and travel advice. Most guesthouses do not make a profit from renting out rooms, so it is a good idea to sample one or more of their other services such as food or booking a tour.

Hotels vary dramatically in terms of luxury, facilities and cleanliness. The most basic hotels rooms tend to be very small, have noisy fans and shared bathrooms. Prices start from around 200 baht, whilst the equivalent rooms with air-con start at around 400 baht.

If you have more money to spend there is no limit to the kind of luxury you could find. All the standards found in luxury hotels in the west are available, still at a fraction of the price. The best hotels have rooftop swimming pools and bars, gymnasiums, spas and saunas and just about anything else you could ask for. Be aware that most of the top hotels add a 7% government tax and an additional 10% service tax.

Although resorts often have all the same facilities as luxury hotels, with prices to match, in Thailand the term can refer to general accommodation and it is a good idea to check out the facilities before you book.

Backpacking and the Environment

Carbon OffsettingAs global warming kicks in and climate change becomes recognized less as a theoretical consideration than a hard fact, the amount of carbon we as individuals put into the atmosphere has a direct impact on all our futures. Of course, we can all cycle to work and turn off our air-conditioning to reduce our carbon footprints, but when it comes to traveling, what are we supposed to do? Travelers can abandon air travel and choose bus or rail, but of those living in Europe or America, only Rambo types are ever going to get to see Thailand or beyond. And that’s never going to happen – realistically people just aren’t going to sacrifice their trip of a lifetime.
To overcome what is clearly a serious dilemma and keep people traveling, a creative solution has emerged – carbon offsetting. According to WikiPedia.com, Carbon offsetting is “the act of mitigating (“offsetting”) greenhouse gas emissions. A well-known example is the purchasing of offsets to compensate for the greenhouse gas emissions from personal air travel”. But exactly how does it work? Today we talk to Kathrin Dellantonio, of myclimate, a Swiss-based non profit foundation with a range of carbon offsetting products.

myclimate talk the talk and walk the walk… we asked lots of companies to do this interview and they were the only ones to step up to the plate – well done myclimate.

We ask Kathrin about the mechanics behind carbon offsetting, and the extent to which it really will have an impact on our futures.

Carbon OffsettingKSR.com: Kathrin – thank you for taking time out of a busy schedule like this to talk to KhaoSanRoad.com… It’s very kind of you. Perhaps you could start by giving our visitors an overview of myclimate and your role in the organization.

Kathrin: myclimate is a nonprofit foundation based in Zurich and active since 2002. We are among the leaders in the international voluntary carbon offset market and known especially for the very high quality of the projects.

We offer offsets for individuals (flights, cars, households); companies, events, products etc. We also have several projects of environmental education where we sensitize people for climate change and try to give them tipps on how to make their behavior more climate friendly. I have been working here for the last two years as head of sales, marketing and communication.

KSR.com: And just so we can get a background to your company’s activity, what is the current situation as far as the environment is concerned? Global warming, climate change – are these buzz words and sounds bites or should we really be concerned?

Kathrin: Gobal warming is something we should be concerned of because it is proven that mankind has a very big impact on the climate system. The IPCC, the highest scientific panel on climate change stressed this in its last report.

KSR.com: Just to get the full picture… Theoretically, if we wanted to see positive changes in the environment in five years rather than twenty, what would the human race have to do right now? It would mean some pretty radical changes in the way people live and earn a living, wouldn’t it?

Kathrin: Yes, changes are requested from all of us. However, the climate system is a very slow system. Emission reductions realized now will bring down the atmospheric CO2 concentrations much later.

KSR.com: For the uninitiated out there, can you give us a broad overview of carbon offsetting and how it works.

Kathrin: Offsetting means that emissions caused at one place are offset somewhere else. For example, with offset money, it is possible to build a biomass power station instead of a coal power station. The biomass station produces much less CO2 than a coal power station, this avoided amount of CO2 is sold.

KSR.com: What sort of carbon offsetting products do you offer?

Kathrin: For individuals – flights, cars, households… For companies – a whole company or parts of it… events, products.

KSR.com: Taking for example a trip from London Heathrow to Suvarnabhumi Airport, how much carbon would that put into the atmosphere and how do you calculate it?

Kathrin: A return economy flight produces 4.508 tons of CO2 equivalents (i.e. also other climate relevant emissions are counted). This is calculated using the distance, fuel consumption and average number of passengers in a plane.

KSR.com: How much would it cost to offset that amount of carbon?

Kathrin: EUR 108

KSR.com:
And if I engage your services for this purpose, what specifically might myclimate do to offset this carbon?

Kathrin: We invest the amount into our projects where the same amount of CO2 is reduced by replacing fossil fuel energy sources with renewable ones and implement energy efficient technologies. For examples please see our website.

KSR.com: I recently saw a program on the BBC where the presenter was flying around the world enjoying himself, and buying carbon offsets to lessen the impact of his travel on the environment. From what I remember, the company that sold the offsets paid for more efficient light bulbs and gave them to a hotel in the Caribbean. Realistically, how long would it take to offset the amount of carbon a trip from London to the Caribbean puts into the atmosphere through the use of more efficient light bulbs? It would be years, wouldn’t it?

Kathrin:
I can’t say anything with regard to this project as I don’t know it. However in our projects we guarantee that the emission reductions are realized and retired from the market no later than 2 years after the purchase.

KSR.com: This is where I get confused about offsetting. If it is going to take a period of years, or even up to a year, to offset the impact of a flight, it’s going to take at least that amount of time for the benefits to kick in. Meanwhile carbon is going into the atmosphere. Isn’t the immediate threat from increased amounts of carbon in the atmosphere greater than the balancing impact of carbon offsetting?

Kathrin: Yes, definitely the amount of CO2 produced now is much bigger than the emission reduction in offset projects. It won’t be possible to offset all CO2 with offset projects. Therefore we all must try to reduce the CO2 emissions.

KSR.com:
I am just playing devil’s advocate here, and I have to askÂ… Isn’t there a danger with your products people feel the more they buy, the more they save the planet?

Kathrin: To counteract this we also do a lot of environmental education in order to show people how they can change to a more climate friendly life. Because for the climate it is course the best if emissions are not produced at all.

KSR.com: So, alongside offsetting your air travel, what advice would you give to the traveler who is concerned about the planet? What can that guy walking down Khao San Road with a backpack on do right now to help the world tomorrow?

Kathrin: When it comes to traveling, he should try to travel with the the least negative impact on the foreign country. Apart from traveling, he should try to reach a more climate friendly consumption pattern, i.e. use public transport, use energy efficient appliances, etc.

KSR.com: Last question – are you a half empty or half full type of person? Are enough people doing enough? Or aren’t we going to make it?

Kathrin: A half full type of person, an optimistic person. I think that we can counteract climate change, but we all need to contribute our part, rethink our consumption patterns and take emission reducing measures.

KSR.com:
Kathrin – thanks for this. Let’s hope that people take into account their impact on the environment and start making the changes we all need.

No Smoking and No Littering

Littering and Smoking“The only thing to do with good advice is to pass it on. It is never of any use to oneself.” Oscar Wilde 1856-1900, British Author. Early evening and marooned amongst the Friday night madness of Siam Square’s “beautiful people” and throat choking traffic, there was only one way I was going to get a much needed beer Chang within the hour……head for the Klong! Whether you’re heading to or from Khao San Road (KSR), and as long as it’s before 7 pm, you should bear in mind the Klong (canal) boat taxis as a great alternative when wishing to explore the city as they have natural air-conditioning, there are no traffic jams and they are dead cheap. What more could you ask for?

From under the bridge just behind the Discovery Centre, Siam Square I arrived at Banglamphoo Pier (located under the bridge between the Queens Gallery and Golden Mount) refreshed and wide awake; after ducking under the low bridges along the way, in under 10 minutes for 5 baht.

After a ten minute walk, passing democracy monument, I was seated on KSR with Chang in hand, beer snacks ordered and unfortunately an all too familiar sight these days….. A young smoker (no, not the green kind) being escorted to the cop shop on the back of a police motorcycle.

NO, this is not going to be an account of my usual Friday night walkabout, but instead a much need reminder for all. Whether you’re back in the kingdom again for some more fun this year or are here to leave your mark for the first time, take note because THINGS HAVE CHANGED!

Although it is not obviously apparent in most areas around the city, especially along KSR, there is a very hefty littering penalty in Thailand (take note of the yellow peril below) which conveniently goes hand in hand with the Government’s Anti-Smoking regulations. Briefly, for the uninformed, smoking is prohibited in ALL public buildings and also “supposedly” in air-conditioned establishments (i.e. bars, clubs & restaurants).

Littering and SmokingYes, I imagine right about now you’re looking around Khao San and thinking, well hey, I don’t see any such rules down here, but go tell that to the dude who stubbed out his cigarette on the ground while at the ATM. He was seen by a local motorcycle patrol officer and taken off to the cop shop; amidst applause from the misunderstood along the way, to be fined. The guy had no idea what he’d done wrong or what was going on. Unnecessary negativity on what may have been his first night out on KSR.

I speak from experience, there’s no way of getting out of it once you’ve been seen littering; in particular easily seen glowing cigarette stubs, so bear in mind that the fine you’ll have to fork out is anything up 2,000 Baht should you get caught. What’s the solution? Basically think twice before you trash anything in the street. Just remember that there’s a heap of restaurants and bars with ashtrays along KSR and litter bins around the city so be cool and make the effort, after all 2,000 Baht buys a lot of fun in the kingdom right?

And remember…..

Keepitreal.