Indian Food in the Khao San Road Area

Indian Food on Khao San Road
Indian Food on Khao San Road
Indian Food on Khao San Road
Indian Food on Khao San Road

There are a wide variety of Indian restaurants around Khaosan Road, all offering a different atmosphere and dining experience. Here is a selection of those available.

The Indian Spice is located at 30 Soi Rambutri, next to King’s Fashion Tailors. The service is friendly and the atmosphere is relaxed with authentic Hindi music played in the background.

The specials include sheesha pipes, where two people can puff for an hour for 200 baht, including a free drink. There are a lot of vegetarian and meat dishes to choose from and the banana lassi is sweet and creamy.

Situated in the center of Khaosan Road, you can’t miss the tasteful neon palm trees outside Taste of India. Inside, the restaurant is very stylishly decorated and this is a good place for couples and families. The window seats are a must as they allow you to look out on the activity of Khaosan Road.

Another great feature of this restaurant is that they offer a delivery service, for when you just can’t make it out of the guesthouse. The owner – Vikas – is very friendly and happy to explain the menu over the phone. Call 081 8101744

Solo diners will feel particularly at home at Rainbow Restaurant, opposite Khaosan Road. Not only is the service friendly and quick, but ther is a large TV mounted on the wall showing Western movies to keep you company. Portionsd are large and the curries are rich and thick. There are even tables outside on the street so that you can stare out lovingly at Khaosan Road.

Red is the colour is Spicy Affair, situated at 235 Soi Rambutri, parallel to Khaosan Road. This sleek hole in the wall feels like something out of Arabian Nights, complete with wizened men smoking sheesha pipes at the back. The hostess is pretty hot too. Call 081 3149307 or 081 173383

Opposite Spicy Affair, Masala India Restaurant provides an entirely Indian experience. Whilst not as stylishly decorated, the family feel and delicious food make this an enjoyable eatery.

‘Taan cow hi arroy na’ – enjoy your food.

Italian Food on Khao San Road

Italian Food on Khao San Road, Bangkok, Thailand
Italian Food on Khao San Road, Bangkok, Thailand
Italian Food on Khao San Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Mama Mia! It’s true that Thai food is delicious and there are many great places around Khaosan Road to eat tasty authentic Thai food. However, there are times when you need a change and your stomach cries out for a pizza or rich pasta dish. Luckily, there are some great places to eat Italian food around Khaosan Road.

If you want to savour the atmosphere of Khaosan Road while you eat, look no further than La Casa, located towards the Buddy Lodge end of Khaosan Road. This friendly, mock-traditional style restaurant is open at the front so that you can look out on the madness and mayhem of Khaosan Road. The menu is reasonably priced, with pasta and pizza dishes at around 200 baht. The calzone is recommended, as are the fish dishes, which come in a wide range of sauces and styles. Tel: 02-629-1627. Open daily 12:00- 24:00.

If you are looking for a stylish atmosphere to relax with a cup of excellent coffee and some good food, look no further than Cafe Primavera, located at 56 Phra Sumen Road, just a short walking distance from Khoasan Road. Open since 1998, this restaurant offers a wide variety of pizza and pasta dishes, Viennese Applestrudel and relaxing jazz music in the background. The set lunch menus are a particularly good deal as diners can choose from three set-menus served between 11:30am and 2pm everyday. Each consists of soup, salad, a main course, soft drink and ice cream for just 175 to 225 baht. Tel: 02 – 281- 4718.

And of course, for those who want and quick pizza fix, there are also branches of Pizza Company and Pizza Hut to temp weary travellers. The nearest branch of Pizza Hut is on Phra Sumen Road and is just a small take away outlet. The nearest branch of Pizza Company is parallel to Khaosan Road on Soi Rhambutri. This is a much larger restaurant with tables on two floors and a large salad bar.

Veggie Delight

Vegetarian Restaurants around Khao San Road and Bangkok, Thailand
Vegetarian Restaurants around Khao San Road and Bangkok, Thailand
Vegetarian Restaurants around Khao San Road and Bangkok, Thailand

Travelling in Thailand can be tough if you’re a vegetarian. Your senses are constantly assaulted by the myriad of meats on sticks barbecued on every street corner and the scent of fried chicken fills the air as you wait patiently for a bus to whisk you away.

Vegetarianism is definitely a lesson in tolerance, and I have learnt to turn a blind eye to the invasions of the meat loving society. Well, almost. Even more difficult, however, is finding decent veggie food, especially if you are on a budget. I spent my first six months in the Land of Smiles surviving mainly on pad Thai and boiled corn, not exactly a rich and varied diet.

But the truth is there are some excellent places for vegetarians to eat in Bangkok, if you know where to go. Here are some of my favourites:

May Kaidee, located 33 Samsen Road (Soi 1) and tucked away on 1117/1 Tanao Road, behind Burger King at the end of Khaosan Road is probably the most popular vegetarian restaurant in the area. Offering an incredibly diverse range of vegetarian Thai, Chinese and Japanese dishes, this is a great place to meet friends. All the dishes are freshly prepared and cooked, with flavours combined to perfection.

The pumpkin soup is simply fantastic, especially with ground ginger on top, and the organic brown rice is healthy and delicious. Dishes are affordable at around 50 Baht each and cooking courses are also available. Open 9 a.m – 11 p.m. daily.

Situated at the end of Soi 2, just off Samsen Road, Cafe Corner is also a great place to unwind. Converted from a traditional Thai shop, the cafe opens right onto the street and has a unique Bohemian feel.

Unusual, uplifting music is played in the background whilst you tuck into baguettes, pancakes or vegetarian Thai food. The range of cocktails makes this the perfect place to gather in the evening as well.

All the vegetables used are organic and come from farms in Suphanburi, Ratchaburi and the cafe’s own garden.

Just a ten minute walk from Khaosan Road, the recently opened Tham-na Home Restaurant can be found at 169 Samsen Road. The restaurant offers deliciously healthy vegetarian and vegan food served in a light and stylishly decorated restaurant. The restaurant’s motto is; “Vegetarian food for meat lovers,” and is a real treat for anyone who appreciates good food. The menu is filled with international favourites such as Japanese dishes, Thai food, hearty breakfasts and fresh, organic salads. There are western staples such as roast potatoes, or you can try the fried lotus root for an exotic alternative. Highly recommended is the baguette with mozzarella cheese and tangy sesame mushrooms.

Tanao Road is becoming a haven for vegetarians and Ethos restaurant brings a slightly Bohemian and cozy feel to the area. The menu is full of vegan and vegetarian dishes featuring flavours from around the world. Customers get to choose between the western style dining tables or sitting on the floor on pretty patterned cushions. Gorgeous red lamps made from red paper hang over the tables and complete the scene.

The Thai vegetarian dishes are a vibrant blend of colours and textures, fresh, crisp vegetables and tasty tofu chunks. The restaurant also serves large portions of western food such as lasagna, falafel and comfort food such as apple crumble and custard. Ethos offers free wifi, making this a great place to spend an afternoon trying the incredible selection of teas and the rich and creamy fruit lassis.

The vegetarian section of Chatuchak Market is one of Bangkok’s best-kept secrets. Also known as Chamlong’s Restaurant after Bangkok’s former governor K. Chamlong, this area features a collection of over thirty stalls selling delicious Thai, Chinese and Western dishes. Each stall offers its own speciality and fake meats are used to create dishes such as “fish” curry in banana leaf and “chicken” skewers.

Best of all, these delicious dishes are incredibly cheap, ranging from 10-20 Baht each, so you can afford to try a whole range. Run by the Santi Asoke monks, food is served daily from 8 a.m. – 2p.m.

Finding Chamlong’s Restaurant can be tricky at first. Take the subway to Kamphaeng Phet (exit 1) and turn right. Walk for five minutes and follow an alleyway between bars to a large warehouse. You can also take bus no 3 from Banglampoo.

If it is authentic Indian food you crave, look no further than Soi Rambutree, opposite Khoasan Road. Here you will find quite a few eateries offering eastern promise, all with an extensive vegetarian selection.

As you can see, there is vegetarian food to suit every taste in Bangkok. Don’t forget to try the Thai speciality Pad see-u Pak (rice noodles with egg and broccoli). Whatever you choose, remember to say arroy maak (tastes very good) at the end of your meal.

About the author:

Kirsty Turner (Kay) is a freelance writer currently living in Bangkok. She has kindly agreed to write for KhaoSanRoad.com and share her love of all things Thai and, especially, all things Khao San Road!

Pad Thai (Fried Noodles): The Stuff of Life

Pad Thai (Fried Noodles): The Stuff of Life
Pad Thai (Fried Noodles): The Stuff of Life
Pad Thai (Fried Noodles): The Stuff of Life
Pad Thai (Fried Noodles): The Stuff of Life
Pad Thai (Fried Noodles): The Stuff of Life

I first tried Pad Thai several years ago in a restaurant in London. It was my first experience of Thai food and I had no idea what to expect. Shortly after ordering, I was presented with a plate of thin noodles, vegetables and tofu, topped with group peanuts and lime. The dish was beautifully presented and it seemed a shame to demolish it, but I was glad that I did. The food was delicious; full of rich flavours, interesting textures and just a little bit spicy. For me it was love at first bite.

When I first arrived in Thailand I was delighted to discover that the Pad Thai I had enjoyed in London for 5 pounds UK could be bought for as little as 20 Baht – 35 pence! Not only that, but the delicious dish can be sampled right on Khaosan Road, allowing you to soak up the atmosphere while you eat. Of course, the price varies according to the quality of ingredients and where you eat it, but a large serving of Pad Thai made with quality ingredients can be bought for 40 or 50 Baht, which is about 1 pound.

I quickly discovered that the ingredients, flavours and presentation of Pad Thai dishes vary significantly between restaurants and areas. Before long I had sampled the dish at most of the restaurants in my area of Bangkok and found my favourite places to eat.

I have found that the tastiest Pad Thai is located not in fancy restaurants but in small, traditional Thai restaurants or from carts on the street. Eating on the street also provides the opportunity for people watching, always a welcome diversion.

One of my favourite places to eat and watch the world go by is on Soi Rambhutri in the heart of Bangkok’s Banglampu. Here, the blend of Thai people, seasoned travelers and hapless tourists makes interesting and often comical entertainment.

One of the very first people I met in Bangkok was Tip as I was wandering down Khao San Road looking for refreshment. The vibrant Thai woman drew me to her with her bright smile and the mouth-watering aroma coming from wok and told me to sit at one of her folding tables next to the curb. I watched as she tossed noodles, sauce, vegetables, tofu and dried shrimp into her wok, talking animatedly with a friend as she cooked.

Within minutes, Tip had produced a large plate of Pad Thai. It smelt great and was very tasty – slightly spicy with the deliciously contrasting textures of chewy noodles and crisp vegetables. Tip stood watching me eat, smiling broadly when I showed my appreciation.

When I finished eating, Tip told me that she had been cooking Pad Thai at her stall for over 15 years. The stall was given to her by her husband’s parents as a marriage present. Tip gradually bought the tables and chairs from her profits and has gradually been adding little touches to personalise the stall.

“I don’t make much money,” Tip told me. “But I am very happy. I can talk to many foreign people and practice speaking English every day.” Tip told me that the best part of her job is watching people enjoy her food. “Everybody likes to enjoy,” she said with a broad smile.

Noodles were first brought to Thailand by Chinese immigrants. They also brought chopsticks and woks, essential equipment for enjoying Pad Thai. However, Thai people traditionally eat rice three times a day and noodles were overlooked for a long time.

The Prime Minister of Thailand, Luang Phibunsongkhram; introduced Pad Thai and made it a national dish during World War II. Thailand was faced with a rice shortage and budget crises at this time and the Prime Minister promoted the eating of Pad Thai to combat the problem.

Today, Pad Thai is enjoyed all over Thailand and indeed all over the world. It is loved by Westerners because it is not spicy like many other Thai dishes and can be eaten at any time of the day or night.

In Bangkok, many Westerners consume Pad Thai after a few beers. As veteran backpacker Dan states; “You can’t beat Pad Thai. It’s cheap, tasty, and the women who cook it are easy on the eye, too!”

About the author:

Kirsty Turner (Kay) is a freelance writer currently living in Bangkok. She has kindly agreed to write for KhaoSanRoad.com and share her love of all things Thai and, especially, all things Khao San Road!